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  1. #71
    Contributor simonca
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbobwillyjim
    Why hasn't BT organised a mass change to their lines to meet the demands of the customers.
    I guess you've not heard about 21CN then.

  2. #72
    Contributor Jimbobwillyjim
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    Sounds interesting i guess this is what my sister new about but for some reason was told not to say anything. So are we looking at groundbreaking fast internet compared to other countries or is it just gonna be fast compared to the sh*te that we have here now. There is a lot of blah blah on there and just wondered what speeds we are likely to be able to get.

  3. #73
    Contributor simonca
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    21CN appears to be ADSL2+ which to most people means 3 times the speeds you can get right now. If you want faster you're going to have to go with cable.

  4. #74
    Contributor cs_elvis
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    Quote Originally Posted by simonca
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbobwillyjim
    Why hasn't BT organised a mass change to their lines to meet the demands of the customers.
    I guess you've not heard about 21CN then.
    Its funny BT are saying that your can watch HD films with this 21CN, yet their promotional video is in a crap wmv 320x240 format.

  5. #75
    Contributor simonca
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    Silly! We haven't got it yet, so they've got to emphasize how limiting the current network is

  6. #76
    Enthusiast Player3746 will become famous soon enough Player3746 will become famous soon enough
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbobwillyjim
    Sounds interesting i guess this is what my sister new about but for some reason was told not to say anything. So are we looking at groundbreaking fast internet compared to other countries or is it just gonna be fast compared to the sh*te that we have here now. There is a lot of blah blah on there and just wondered what speeds we are likely to be able to get.
    Rollover to BT's 21st Century network will be taking place over the next few years and is expected to be completed by 2011.

    BT's 21CN provides an IP end to end infrastructure which is cheaper than currect circuit switched infrastructure - the current CS infrastructure requires physical switches to divert phone access at local, national and international exchanges. We all know that network technology is based on routing and as a result this provides a simpler method for sending traffic than the traditional circuit switched method.

    As for speed, I havn't got the information but optical fibre transmission is much faster than traditional twisted cable made of copper that suffers from attenuation. We know that the distance between our telephony equipment and the local exchange (or access nodes if you live too far from the exchange) has a bearing on internet speeds due to attenuation (so those who criticise current technologies and their ISPs are being unfair and programmes like Watchdog talk absolute cobblers). Optical fibre still suffers from attenuation (a degradation over distance) but regenerators can boost digital signals much more easily than analogue signals - bossting analogue signals also boosts noise too - hence there is a higher signal to noise ratio.

    Contention ratio will still be a factor - there is only so much that can be carried but optical fibre has greater bandwidth hence contention ratio will not be as great. The contention ratio determines how much demand there is for the use of bandwidth. Currently, contention ratio varies between ISPs because not all ISPs provide the same amount of bandwidth (nor provide the same amount of temporary IP allocations when connecting to the internet) hence this is why some ISPs will provide users with better connections than others at certain times of the day so the distance between your internet equipment and the exchange or access node isn't the only factor. You pay low prices to ISPs for high contention ratios and less temporary IP allocation - if you want greater performance then go with ISPs that provide lower contention ratios and have higher allocation of temporary IPs for connection to the internet. With higher bandwidth optical fibre, this will be less of an issue but still an issue nonetheless unless the optical fibre runs direct to your home.

  7. #77
    Junior Member UKtaxman
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    I'm pretty certain that ADSL2+ is limited to ~24mbit, which is (seeing as it hasn't been fully implemented yet) is well behind many other countries, especially if they're intending this as a long term technology.

  8. #78
    Enthusiast Player3746 will become famous soon enough Player3746 will become famous soon enough
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    Quote Originally Posted by UKtaxman
    I'm pretty certain that ADSL2+ is limited to ~24mbit, which is (seeing as it hasn't been fully implemented yet) is well behind many other countries, especially if they're intending this as a long term technology.
    ADSL2+ is an international standard and was formalised by the ITU, a member of the United Nations. Being a standard, ADSL2+ in the UK should not be behind other nations as the specifications are clearly defined in the standards.

    ADSL2+ must not be confused with BT's 21st Century Network which is IP-based nor compared to higher speed broadband in countries like Japan which are also IP-based. In comparison with many OECD countries, the UK is not falling behind.

    ADSL2+ is based on traditional copper wire technology. BT's rollout of the 21CN does include expanding the availability of ADSL2+ by upgrading local exchanges but the technology is NOT part of the IP-based 21CN. 21CN will in time offer its own high speed broadband access and as these will be provided by digital signals over optical fibre, the signals can be regenerated without loss of data (provided that these signals are regenerated at appropriate points within the optical fibre links). This provides a much higher speed of data transfer becasue attenuation is overcome by regeneration (as I mentioned earlier).

    However, the signal from the optical fibre reaches the local exchange and enters our homes via copper cables from the local exchange and one of the properties of copper is resistivity so we won't receive the theoretical maximum speed that can be transferred across optical fibres. I can only assume that in Japan they must be sending the signal from their exchanges to customers' homes via optical fibre rather than twisted pair copper cabling if they are receiving 100mbit/s speeds.


 
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